­Sandoval Young womenSPRINGFIELD – State Senator Martin A. Sandoval (D-Chicago) is cosponsoring legislation to declare April 2, 2019 as Pay Equity Day in Illinois to raise awareness about pay inequity for women.

American women have long faced discrimination in the workplace, particularly in terms of compensation. Nationally, women continue to earn no more than 80 cents on the dollar compared to men. In Illinois, women currently earn only 78 cents on the dollar compared to men.

“It is absurd that women in this country still earning less than men on average for performing the same jobs,” Sandoval said. “We need to work harder to ensure that every person is fairly compensated for their contributions in the workplace regardless of gender.”

Equal Pay Day was first created by the National Committee on pay Equity in 1996 to draw attention to the gap between men’s and women’s wages.

The day is observed in April to symbolize how far into the year a woman must work, on average, to earn as much as a man earned the previous year. Equal Pay Day always falls on a Tuesday to represent the day of the week on which women’s wages catch up to men’s wages from the previous week.

Sandoval Guv presserSPRINGFIELD – Legislation Co-Sponsored by State Senator Martin A. Sandoval (D-Chicago) to increase the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour passed the Illinois House of Representatives, marking a major win in the fight to ensure Illinois workers are guaranteed a fair wage.

“As legislators, we are committed to guaranteeing a living wage and protecting the dignity of workers,” Sandoval said. “I’m glad to see that the House followed our lead in approving this historic legislation recognizing the benefits this bill will bring to working class families in Illinois.”

Senate Bill 1 would gradually increase the minimum wage in Illinois to $15 an hour by 2025. The step-by-step rollout of the increase is designed to allow businesses to adjust to the law and adapt accordingly. The first increase will take effect on Jan. 1, 2020 and set the minimum wage at $9.25.

Illinois’ minimum wage has been $8.25 an hour since 2010.

Senate Bill 1 now awaits the governor’s signature.

­SandovalPortrait FlagsSPRINGFIELD – State Senator Martin A. Sandoval (D-Chicago) commended the Illinois Department of Human Services’ decision Wednesday to issue Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits early to avoid a disruption that could hurt Illinois families on the Southwest side of Chicago.

“Struggling families should not have to worry about where their next meal will come from because of the president’s costly and unnecessary government shutdown,” Sandoval said. “I am pleased to see that IDHS recognizes the importance of ensuring that Illinois families are able to claim the benefits they need to get through difficult times.”

March SNAP benefits will be loaded into recipients’ accounts on March 1.

February benefits through the program were issued in January as a result of the federal government shutdown, leaving a long gap before recipients would again be able to claim benefits on which they rely. Benefits are typically issued at different times throughout the month.

SNAP is a federal program that provides food subsidies to families who cannot afford to buy groceries.

­Sandoval SB 1SPRINGFIELD – Legislation cosponsored by State Senator Martin A. Sandoval (D-Chicago) to increase the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour passed Thursday, marking a major win in the fight to ensure Illinois workers are guaranteed a fair wage.

“Hundreds of thousands of Illinoisans have been disadvantaged by the federal minimum wage that should be a considered starvation wage, not a dignified living wage. The opportunity to earn a fair wage and provide for your family is a right, not a privilege,” Sandoval said. “This wage increase will provide stability to struggling families in Illinois and help them lift themselves out of poverty.”

Senate Bill 1 would gradually increase the minimum wage in Illinois to $15 an hour by 2025. The step-by-step rollout of the increase is designed to allow businesses to adjust to the law and adapt accordingly. The first increase will take effect on Jan. 1, 2020 and set the minimum wage at $9.25.

Illinois’ minimum wage has been $8.25 an hour since 2010.

“The men and women of Illinois who work tirelessly to provide for their families are long overdue for a pay increase. It’s absurd that in spite of the rising cost of living, this is the first time we have increased the minimum wage in almost a decade,” Sandoval said. “As members of the General Assembly, it is our duty to protect the dignity and rights of our workers.”

Senate Bill 1 will now move to the House of Representatives.

Office Info

Springfield Office:
Senator 12th District
111 Capitol Building
Springfield, IL 62706
217-782-5304

District Office:
5807 W. 35th Street
Cicero, IL 60804
708-656-2002